Category: Theatre

Review: The Who’s Tommy

By Kiana Emmett

In it’s Australian Premiere, The Victorian Opera’s production of The Who’s Tommy is a camp, acid trip into The Who’s ground-breaking concept album. Following a young boy who is ‘deaf, dumb and blind’ that becomes a Pinball Wizard, Tommy is a step back in time, told with a modern twist.

Stylistically, it feels as though the production sits between two different time periods: what is indicated by the story and music, and what is chosen vocally. The vocals of especially the leading cast are more contemporary, whereas the music suggests a more old-school rock sound, of which The Who are synonymous with. That being said, musical director Jack Earle treads the line between these two well, and helps the cast to shine musically.


As the show is a Rock Opera, the story is sung through, and the tight knit, in-sync band are to be commended for driving the show, as it felt as though the music was thrusting the show forward rather than anything else. At times this I felt as though it was a little rushed, with there not being a moment to acknowledge the end of a song with applause before the audience were back into the action. I found this intense and overwhelming some of the time, with not much time to comprehend where the show was going. The costume design by Isaac Lummis was well done, with clear depictions between time and space. The Acid Queen’s flamboyant and dramatic costume was a highlight, as were Mrs Walker’s multitude of costume changes throughout the show.


Amy Lehpamer as Mrs Walker was divine. ‘Smash the Mirror’ was a highlight as her chilling vocals carried all the way through the Palais. The emotional complexity of her character was clear, despite her limited opportunities to really externalise it. Her anguish for her son, and her complicated relationship with her husband I found thoroughly engaging. Matt Heatherington was magnetic as Captain Walker, always drawing your eye with his presence on stage. The gravel like tones of his voice, mixed with the character’s sophisticated, put together dress sense was an interesting juxtaposition between his past experience, and how he wanted those around him to view him. His voice was extraordinary and his performance was a standout.


The ensemble were strong throughout, linking scenes and times together with their clear character presence that really built and enhanced the world. ‘Pinball Wizard’ and ‘Miracle Cure’ were particular standouts. Aided by the richness of Dana Jolly’s choreography, where the music and lyrics failed to provide clarity, they were there to soften the blow.


Vincent Hooper and Kanen Breen were both brilliant in their portrayals of Cousin Kevin and Uncle Ernie, dynamic, while bringing the darkness needed in their abusive characters. They helped make up a cast of truly exceptional vocalists, there was no faulting the musical capabilities of the cast as a whole.
Mat Verevis as Tommy was intricate and well executed, with the depth and complexity required to make an audience relate to a character that for the vast majority of the show cannot present their emotions whatsoever. His voice was stellar, and I found him captivating.


The Who’s Tommy is a whirlwind of 70’s rock and roll, and will be thoroughly enjoyed by anyone who is familiar with the source material of the concept album and film.


The Who’s Tommy is playing at The Palais Theatre through March 1st. Tickets can be purchased through the Arts Centre

Photography by Jeff Busby

Review: Fun Home

By Kiana Emmett

Moments are transient, memories are at times unreliable, though once a person is gone, grappling at those moments are all you have left.

In the Melbourne Theatre Company’s vibrant production of Fun Home, cartoonist Alison Bechdel’s journey to find truth and clarity about her father’s death leaves her spiralling into her upbringing, reliving both light and shade through her Little and Medium Alison counterparts. Based on Bechdel’s graphic memoir, with book and lyrics by Lisa Kron and sweeping score by Jeanine Tesori, Fun Home made history with the first female writing team to win the Tony Award for Best Original Score. Its appeal translates to Australian stages, with its universal themes of family, loss and identity making a heartfelt production.

The sharp, meticulously executed direction by David Bryant brings out the humour and heartbreak of the source material, and ‘Come to the Fun Home’ was a crowd favourite, with the performances of the younger cast garnering praise and applause. ‘Ring of Keys’ specifically was performed with pinpoint precision, excellently depicting an innocence and a knowledge far beyond her years.

Ursula Searle as Medium Alison was near perfection. Her portrayal was raw and vulnerable, awkward and uncomfortable and uplifting, it was exactly what life should be. She put her whole life force into the character and the result was a depth and immensity that was a joy to watch.

Alicia Clements’ set design is spectacular, and the use of the roundtable stage was especially poignant, representing the cycle of life and death, and how the two are inextricably linked.

Musical Director Carmel Dean presents vocals and a 7-piece orchestra that ebbs and flows and feels as alive and present as those on stage. It always feels as though the music is a manifestation of character wants and needs, instead of being for the sake of song- the sign of a great musical.

The standouts of the production however were parents Bruce and Helen Bechdel (played by Adam Murphy and Silvie Paladino respectively). They brought depth and complexity to their characters. Paladino’s ‘Days and Days’ was soul crushing and exquisite. Her electric presence and energy on stage spills out into the audience and touches anyone lucky enough to be in the presence of her performance. Murphy’s portrayal is a triumph, the complexity and subtlety of his performance of which treads the line between his responsibilities as a parent and his duty to be true to himself as an individual. This often manifests itself in angry outbursts taken out on those around him, which would be more truly directed to the world he lives in. He longs for the opportunity to be as open and forthright with his identity as his daughter is.

Euan Fitstrovic-Doidge’s vocal prowess is on full display with ‘Raincoat of Love’, as was his versatility, as he slid through characters effortlessly throughout the piece.  

The candid, conversational tone that Alison (Lucy Maunder) brings to the show provides relief from the larger, more complex issues taking part in non-linear vignettes. She is understated at first, before finding herself falling into her memories, which makes her shift into ‘Telephone Wire’ (where gay father and daughter long to connect over their similarities, instead of divide themselves in their differences) all the more heartbreaking and beautiful. This transformation at the end of the show, where we’ve seen Alison grow, mature and find herself, from the little girl who didn’t want to wear a dress, and sees herself in the butch delivery woman she encounters in a diner, To an overexcited college student who is exploring her sexuality with Joan (excellently portrayed by Emily Havea, who brings sultry and supportive tones), to the mature woman who leads us through the show, grappling with the death of her father is brilliantly executed and thoroughly engaging.   

Fun Home is a celebration of self-discovery, family and love, with the joy of discovery, ecstasy of love, and the crushing pain of loss. It is an invitation to view the impact of not living authentically as oneself can have on a person and their loved ones. Fun Home is a ground-breaking triumph. You must see it.

Fun Home is playing at the Art Centre Playhouse through March 5th. Tickets can be booked at: https://www.mtc.com.au/plays-and-tickets/whats-on/season-2022/fun-home/

Interview: Silvie Paladino on Fun Home

By Kiana Emmett

Based on Alison Bechdel’s bestselling graphic novel about growing up and coming out, the groundbreaking, multi-Tony Award-winning musical Fun Home, arrives in Melbourne following its acclaimed Sydney season. Directed by Dean Bryant (Torch the Place) and featuring a stellar cast that includes Lucy Maunder (Ladies in Black) and Silvie Paladino (Mamma Mia!), this production promises to make you laugh, cry and love until your heart is full.

Silvie Paladino plays Helen Bechdel, Alison Bechdel’s mother in the MTC production of Fun Home. She took the time to talk to us at the Media Preview ahead of the show’s opening night this week.

Q. What do you think makes Fun Home different from the other shows running in Melbourne at the moment?

I think certainly the topics that are touched on, we talk about diversity, mental illness, mental health. It talks about so many things: family, acceptance, homosexuality, so many major topics in life have been squeezed into an hour and forty minutes of this show. With an incredible score and an incredible book, I mean the story is so moving and funny and full of emotions. It won multiple Tony Awards, yeah, it’s an extraordinary piece.

Q. How has COVID shifted the way you prepare and the way you sustain yourself during a show season?

It’s hard because you lose that show fitness. I know people don’t see this but we are similar to athletes in that our voices are our muscle, and if we don’t use them we lose that elasticity, that flexibility that comes with singing. So it’s been hard, it’s been challenging to get back in the swing of things. But it’s also been extremely fulfilling and I feel like we are back where we belong, not sitting on the couch in our moccasins, even though that is wonderful! I would kill to be doing that right now! But it’s great to be doing it again. You appreciate the job so much more now than we possibly did before because we haven’t been able to do it.

Q. What do you hope audiences take away from this show?

I hope that audiences will hopefully be open minded, broaden their ideas of what families are and what we are as individuals. For me, we are called to love each other no matter what and I think this show, I hope this show will get people talking about their own unique family dynamic. Because we’re all different aren’t we? And rather than judging, and casting judgement on others, that we can just love one another. That’s what I hope comes out of it.

Fun Home is currently playing at the Arts Centre Playhouse through March 5th. Tickets can be purchased at https://www.mtc.com.au/plays-and-tickets/whats-on/season-2022/fun-home/

Review: Every Second

Fertile dark comedy

By Owen James

WIT Theatre’s latest offering depicts the emotional rollercoaster endured by two couples struggling to conceive a child. Through a darkly comic lens, a strong script from Vanessa Bates dissects the societal pressure and inner conflict surrounding this largely unspoken subject matter.

Madeleine Magee Carr as borderline obsessive Meg is a perfect blend of hilarious and chilling in pursuing her burgeoning child-bearing obsession. Carr’s portrait of a wannabe mother on the verge of desperation is often moving, rousing our sympathy when fighting circumstances beyond her control. But she is also the source of great comedy, anxiously seeking a remedy through herbs, fertility statues – any potential antidote charges a new level of fixation. Carr fuels her culminating moments of catharsis with pent-up frustration, expertly bringing Meg’s arc to a fiery finale.

Meg’s partner, Tim (Riley Nottingham) is withdrawn and agitated, unenthused by the failing fertility regimes. The reasons behind Nottingham’s characterisation become apparent as the plot is teased out, and his dismissive, callous attitude is the perfect chalk to Meg’s cheese. He is also a source of discomfort for Richard Mealey as Bill, a calm, supportive quasi-friend. Bill and his wife Jen (Lansy Feng) are more comfortable with their fertility struggle, and are beginning their journey with assisted reproductive technology, opting for IVF. Their stark contrast in attitude, patience, and beliefs help drive both comedy and drama between the two couples.

This well-matched cast thrive under Emma Drysdale’s direction, combining naturalistic and presentational styles to grab and hold our attention with each new scene. Drysdale utilises the traverse staging of the Bluestone Church Arts Space to great effect – and it’s enormous fun to watch the audience opposite you whipping their heads left and right as if it were a tennis match during scenes with rapid-fire dialogue. Riley Tapp’s simple, detailed, and highly effective set design is put to tremendous use, particularly in the ‘pregnancy ballet’, featuring sublime choreography by Sophie Loughran.

Every Second is a glimpse into the turbulent lives of couples coping with infertility, and the range of reactions and responses that can result. Loose threads are tugged and converge, prompting ingenious and unexpected twists which are executed with a chill by a sensational cast. Well worth a trip to Footscray.

Tickets and info: https://www.witinc.com.au/shows/every-second

Review: Mara Korper

Long live the new flesh

By Owen James

Citizen Theatre’s new work is a feminist dystopia that playfully dissects the boundaries of gender binary and disrupted social norms under the toxic authoritarian rule of the Mother Administration. The citizens are well-behaved, kept in line with a sturdy regime of disinformation, gaslighting, and conciliation – and as the underlying conspiracy unwraps, an impasse is reached and (spoiler alert) blood is shed.

Writer/Director Jayde Kirchert has concocted a fascinating futuristic landscape, void of gender politics and rife with hierarchical secrecy. It is no small order to deliver a fully-realised alternate world on stage with limited space and settings, but Kirchert’s masterful text achieves this with aplomb. Our language is deliciously twisted into familiar yet absurd new phrases that highlight the nonsensical procedures regulating these tortured residents. My personal favourite: “how luck-filled your basket is, that you fished that group of letters out of your word closet”, which had me giggling for about five minutes.

Akin to popular dystopian literary and cinematic works such as The Handmaid’s Tale, Terry Gilliam’s Brazil, or 1984, the message is clear: that to dismantle an overbearing hierarchy, we must challenge what we are told – even at the threat of punishment. Blindly obeying orders is obstructing societal growth and promoting inequality, despite the Mother’s drive for conformity. This resonates particularly in light of protests such as those that took place in Hong Kong in 2020; citizens with restricted rights have cause to revolt.

The ensemble of eight are perfectly matched, attuned to a unified sense of storytelling and world-building through the use of significant gestus, and their skilful navigation of Anthony Lyons’ delicious harmonies. Audience favourite Kayla Hamill is a comedic delight as Assistant Hans and Superior Clarence, playfully stealing every scene they are in. Shamita Siva as Assistant Konrad filled every line with ferocity and devout allegiance to The Mother, bursting energy into every scene.

Set Design from Stu Brown sees everyday objects take on a new life as part of The Mother’s new-world evangelism. Atop a rotating platform sat on a larger platform, characters spout their sectarian fealty, elevated by Clare Springett’s bold Lighting Design and Aislinn Naughton’s appropriately uniform Costume Design. Compositions from Anthony Lyons are deep, dark and electronic, and incorporate a Midi ring worn by a performer – responding to each gesture in the moment, creating a fascinating soundscape exclusive to each performance.

Mara Korper has launched with the fortuitous timing of Instagram’s addition of pronouns into a profile’s bio this week. As we enter an age where gender binary is disassembled, Citizen Theatre encourage that conversation with a piece where gender is beautifully irrelevant and “Sie” covers all. It is the personal histories (or lack thereof) and future of these characters we are invested in. They are not defined by gender, nor do they need to be for us to follow their arcs. There is also a fascinating underlying commentary about body image and body positivity, as we see the surface consequences of a people forbidden from “breathlessness or stress”, to keep korpers “round and soft”. We cannot help but consider how our culture may degrade if we continue down as unhealthy a path.

Citizen Theatre are a force to be reckoned with. I adore each new terrain they traverse as they build a catalogue of unique, playful theatre that transcends genre and defines their own thundering style. (See past reviews for Forgotten Places (2019) and Ascent (2018).) Mara Korper takes their creativity to a new level; a pensive remedy amidst a tempestuous world alive with cause for conversation.

At TheatreWorks, St Kilda until 22 May 2021.
170 minutes incl. interval
Tickets: https://www.theatreworks.org.au/program/mara-korper/

The Music of the Night – The songs of Andrew Lloyd Webber

Pure perfection – you won’t get better on Broadway!

By Sebastian Purcell

This is the ultimate musical and Andrew Lloyd Webber fans dream show. More than 90 minutes of pure joy from the most talented cast to perform at Chapel off Chapel – and I’m not exaggerating, this should be playing in Hamer Hall.

With songs from Phantom of the Opera, Love Never Dies, Evita, Sunset Boulevard, Cats, Jesus Christ Superstar, Whistle down the Wind and others, this wonderfully staged show gives respect to each song and performance through its own simple but effective lighting in the fittingly intimate Chapel; the brilliant starry night backdrop (Harrie Hogan), choreography (Celina Yuen) and staging (Director Theresa Borg), creating scenes all unto themselves.

The cast – Bianca Bruce, Andy Conaghan, Madison Green, Genevieve Kingsford, Cherine Peck, Christopher Scalzo, Caitlin Spears, Tod Strike and Raphael Wong – are sublime in their delivery, their vocals are warm, big and pitch perfect. Special guest Debra Bryne is an absolute delight and brings a raw authenticity to her performances which left the cast and audience visibly emotional. There’s something so real and heartfelt when Bryne performs the song Memory that it feels like a big love letter from her time originating the role of Grizabella in Cats in 1985.

Its so hard to pick favourites, but I will because there are moments that stood out that made my night, including Wong’s opening number of The Music of the Night, sung as well as I’ve heard Simon Gleeson sing. His tone is just so smooth and the vocal control is insane. The cello accompaniment was the perfect choice to let his vocals shine.

Another standout was Evita by Bianca Bruce, and even though I saw Evita in Melbourne, I thought Bruce knocked it out of the park; the strength, the precision and a real emotional essence, not to mention the wonderful harmony from the cast humming along was stunning.

A new favourite for me from the evening is now Too Much in Love to Care, Sunset Boulevard (Conaghan & Spears). The harmonies are gorgeous and made me feel a real connection between them.

And I just cant go past Macavity, Cats by Bruce & Scalzo. It was playful, a joy to watch, and some serious vocals to match.

Across the cast you could feel a sense of connection and respect for one another, and how it lifted each other up; you could see how special it was to have Byrne on stage with them. I’m clearing my calendar for a second viewing!

I could go on about every song, they were all amazing, and wonderfully accompanied by Music Director Stephen Gray and the band, Gary Norman, Nathan Post and John Clarke.

You’d be crazy to miss this very short season of just 6 shows at Chapel off Chapel from 12 May to 16 May

Tickets available at www.chapeloffchapel.com.au

Photography by Ben Fon

Film review: Twist

A modern retelling of a Dickens’ classic with a little extra twist.

By Narelle Wood

In this remaking of Charles Dickens’ classic, directed by Martin Owen, Twist offers a fresh ending that addresses issues of exploitation, and provides some consequences for bad behaviour.

Filmed in a style that is something more akin to a Guy Richie action film in parts, the opening sequence follows a fast-paced parkour action sequence. This sets up not only the modern retelling, but the intrigue and misadventure that ensues. Owen’s direction slows throughout the film, replaced by an action-inspired soundtrack to help create a sense of urgency.

Young Oliver (played by both Samuel Leakey and Finley Pearson), all though brief in appearance, captures the naivety, sadness and grief that produces the older, wiser and self-sufficient Twist (Raff Law). With a disregard for authority and a need to belong and survive, Twist meets and befriends Dodge (Rita Ora), Batesy (Franz Drameh) and Red (Sophie Simnett), and is introduced into the seductively comfortable but manipulative underworld that Fagan (Michael Caine) has created. Fagan soon sees Twist’s potential as an advantage to his crew, and the sense of family offered by Fagan soon becomes apparent to Twist. The remake plays up the heist and thievery nature of the Oliver Twist original with interactions between Fagan andBill Sykes (Lena Headey) providing a glimpse into the real danger in the world these characters inhabit.

Stripped of the song and dance numbers the fans of the musical will be familiar with, the grit and devastation is at times more pronounced. The overt nature of some of the manipulation and, well to put it bluntly, grooming, I found to be a little uncomfortable, especially in contrast to the lighter feeling attempts at ‘street cred’ through the use of graffiti and parkour. The contrast between the street and the underworld was perhaps a little too great, making the twist ending plausible but perhaps a little bit too light.

There are some other points of unevenness, but I think it’s to be expected when you play with the very familiar storyline that is Oliver Twist, and put the experience of Caine and Headey up against the younger cast of Law, Ora, Drameh, and Simnett. That’s not to say these young actors don’t do a fabulous job, they absolutely do, just that Caine and Headey play the characters with an unquantifiable ease.

This is probably not going to hit the mark with die-hard Dickens traditionalists, but it is an interesting look at this previously dark children’s tale. It’s a grim tale with a lighter and satisfying ending.

Now showing.

Review: The Pitts

A high-octane energy masterclass in how to be well from those who really shouldn’t teach it.

By Sebastian Purcell

The Pitts is an enthusiastic and camp cabaret, taking the residents of Shady Pines Nursing Home through their Weekly Wednesday Wellness Program, inviting everyone to boost their five pillars of wellness: physical, mental, social, spiritual and emotional.

Carol and Daryl Pitts (Stephanie Marion Wood and Brendy Ford) must use the skills they obtained through their self-designed six-week theatre course to navigate the ups and downs of their professional and private lives and keep their geriatric residents “stayin alive” for just another week.

This is a highly fun and laugh-out loud cabaret with some wonderful comedic timing by writer and choreographer Brendan Ford and Musical direction by Stephanie Marion Wood. The pair deliver tandem dance routines reminiscent of 1990’s aerobicise in ‘100 percent polyester’ blue and pink sparkling tracksuits, to tracks such as Rhianna’s SOS, Where have you been and Disturbia, and Katy Perry’s Firework and Last Friday Night.

The vocals are carried by Wood who does a terrific job in maintaining the high energy routines and singing other hits such as Absolutely Everybody, You Can’t Stop the Music and Physical. However, it is her moments at the piano, in particular Carol’s lament (under pillar 4 Spiritual) over husband Daryl’s ‘suckiness’, with Bette Midler’s Wind Beneath My Wings, which delivers the most impactful performance; it is a highlight for the show.

Brendy Ford delivers some terrific deadpan backing vocals, and has a standout dance performance once he reaches emotional wellness; it’s a shame that we don’t get a true vocal performance from Ford.

Cameo performances from Stacey Kelly and Leigh Jay Booth, as Nurse and resident Ethel respectively, are slightly under-utilised, and their interactions, while comedic, also reflect some of the recent commentary within the aged-care sector. 

There are a number of gags that are a hit with the audience, who were roaring with laughter throughout, including at references to the infamous Sydney Ruby Princess and a timeshare orgy at Lake Eildon. Despite this, there are moments that I found that languished, like a really long lunch-break scene that breaks the flow; I wonder whether this might have been better punctuated with an additional ballad.

Overall, this is a terrific show for the whole family, provided everyone’s okay with the occasional mild sexual innuendo the prospect of some audience participation. The Pitts played at the Athenaeum Theatre, Collins St, Melbourne.

Photography courtesy of Salty Theatre

Review: Aida

An exquisite re-telling of love and war more than 150 years in the making

By Sebastian Purcell

Opera Australia presents Verdi’s Aida with its long awaited premier on the back of a closed Arts Centre; making up for the 2020 hiatus with a truly dazzling and rich production. Under the wonderful direction of Davide Livermore and conducted by Tahu Matheson, the 60 strong cast (and orchestra) displayed such enthusiasm and discipline that every word could be heard within the wonderful State Theatre perfezionamento.

Aida, first staged in 1871, is a tragic love story set in the middle of a war between the Egyptians and Ethiopians. Egypt’s King (Gennadi Dubinsky) enlists Radamès (Stefano La Colla) as his battle commander while the king’s daughter, Amneris (Elena Gabouri), pines for Radamès love. Unbeknownst to all, Aida (Leah Crocetto), a slave of the Egyptians, is in love with Radamès, which is reciprocated, but to complicate things further, Aida is also the daughter and princess of Ramfis (Alexander Vinogradov / David Parkin) the King of Ethiopia. A tug of war between loyalty for country and love ensues, ending in a climatic declaration of love and the ultimate sacrifice.

This production of Aida steps into the digital age, utilising 10 large LED screens to give depth and provide scene setting. This vibrant statement bringing this opera into the modern age. The wonderful projections of the black panther and the golden cobra are a menacing back drop at times, wonderfully animated as to not take away from the performers on stage. Other key highlights include being bathed in the Nile, to being entombed in a Great Pyramid. The incredibly powerful final scene is a triumph of staging with suspended props and use of the digital boards.

Leah Crocetto as Aida, the leading soprano, was sublime; such command of her voice and intensity for almost 3 hours is sure to be admired. Elena Gabouri and Stefano La Colla were equally breathtaking in their craft and command of the stage. And costume designer Gianluca Falaschi deserves a shout out for the lavish costumes, especially for over 60 performers and really bringing the audience into an ancient Egyptian court room.

While there were some minor technical difficulties experienced during the first act, with the surtitles screen not operating, making it slightly trickier for those unfamiliar to follow. This was quickly rectified for the second act onwards, and to be fair the sets, costumes and choreography (Davide Livermore and Shane Placentino) made the surtitles an added bonus rather than an absolute necessity for translation.

Aida plays at the Victorian Arts Centre, State Theatre from 6 – 21 May, 2021. Tickets are between $69 – $287. Book at https://www.artscentremelbourne.com.au/

Photograph courtesy Opera Australia

Review: Everyone is Famous

Growing up in a social media world; all, nothing or somewhere in between

By Kiana Emmett

Everyone Is Famous (directed by Katrina Cornwell and written by Morgan Rose) depicts the impact of social media on this generation through an almost unbiased, transparent weigh in of positives and negatives.

Through telling the stories of nine young people, Everyone is Famous shows us how it is to grow in this new social media riddled world. It is a celebration of having the choice to be everything, nothing, or anything in between. It champions choice, and exploration of self.

The cast is strong, providing raw, truthful commentary on our society. I found it interesting and powerful that the characters were named after the actors portraying them, and connection to the source material was evident.

Perhaps the most impressive part of the production is the use of technology (Sound & AV by Justin Gardam). The phone shaped screens that hung above the actors and worked as their communication with the audience, showing us the way they wanted to be perceived. This was quite different to what we had seen prior and post. It worked to remind us that social media is never what is really going on in a person’s life, and that it is merely the expression of what an individual wishes to be perceived as.

The shift into an almost post-apocalyptic world following social media’s overtaking of society was a stark reminder that the concept isn’t as outlandish as we may have once thought. The reoccurring themes throughout the play help to ground it with its more realistic first half.

The result is a touching, amusing, heartfelt, relatable depiction of what it is to grow up, and to grow up while being influenced by the choice to be all, nothing or anywhere in between.

The Northcote Town Hall, with its intimate setting works perfectly enveloping the audience, and bringing them into this world. It feels as though you are a victim of social media, but also held accountable for it at the same time, that you are the problem and the solution. This adds to the feeling of duality throughout the piece, and leaves you feeling torn between the two.

Everyone is Famous is thought-provoking, heartfelt, brilliantly funny and everything we need right now. It is a must see.

‘Everyone Is Famous’ played from April 21- May 1st at The Northcote Town Hall

Photography by Darren Gill